Tag Archives: Web security

Security testing for REST API with w3af

Nowadays more and more companies provide web APIs to access their services. They usually follow REST style. Such a RESTful web service looks like a regular web application. It accepts an HTTP request, does some magic, and then replies with an HTTP response. One of the main differences is that the reply doesn’t normally contain HTML to be rendered in a web browser. Instead, the reply usually contains data in a format (for example, JSON or XML) which is easier to process by another application.

Unfortunately, since a RESTful web service is still a web application, it may contain typical security vulnerabilities for web applications such as SQL injections, XXE, etc. One of the ways to identify security issues in web applications is to use web security scanners. Fortunately, since a RESTful web service is still a web application, we can use web security scanners to look for security issues in web APIs.

There are several well-known web security scanners. One of them is w3af created by Andres Riancho. I’ll focus on this scanner in the post.

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Configuring security for REST API in Spring

In most cases, REST APIs should be accessed only by authorized parties. Spring framework provides many ways to configure authentication and authorization for an application. Another good thing is that the framework usually provides relatively good default settings. But nevertheless, it may be better to understand what’s going on rather then rely on the defaults.

This post contains a list of things which may be good to pay attention to when you configure or review authentication and authorization settings for a RESTful application based on Spring (boot) framework. However this is not a comprehensive guideline (if such a guideline even exist) which tells how to configure authentication and authorization for an application based on Spring framework. It’s more like a collection of tips and suggestions. Furthermore, any other suggestions and comments are more than welcome.

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Integrating OWASP Dependency Check in to development process

OWASP Dependency Check is a well known open-source tool which can track dependencies in your project and identify components with known published vulnerabilities. The tool supports multiple languages and platforms such as Java, .NET, Ruby and Python. One of the simplest ways how you can use Dependency Check in your project is just to run it manually. This way has at least one disadvantage: you have to make sure that you run the tool regularly. Fortunately there is a couple of ways how you can automate this process.

But unfortunately sometimes it’s not enough just to automate something. If the tool reports a vulnerability it means someone has to fix it. At least it would be good to evaluate the problem. In a perfect world, all issues are addressed immediately, but in the real world, development teams always have no time for that. Besides integrating Dependency Check to CI/CD, there may be a couple of other steps to get vulnerable dependencies updated.

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An overview of secure usage of TLS

Here is a brief overview which describes how TLS can be used for establishing a secure TLS connection. First, we briefly discuss what SSL/TLS protocols are. Next, we’ll talk about secure TLS protocol versions and parameters. Finally, we’ll describe how TLS can be parametrized securely.

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